No major flaws to report
The TERK Trinity Amplified Indoor HDTV Antenna doesn't look like any other TV antenna that we've seen, but it does look a lot like some internet routers we've used. We like the slim, distinctive look, plus the ability to adjust and reposition the three tri-modal antennas as needed to maximize reception.
Found fewer channels 

Mohu's new Blade antenna is a one-of-a-kind – instead of a floppy sheet, it's a thicker, rectangular plastic panel that you might not be compelled to hide. You could mount it on the wall below the TV like a soundbar, or there's a little attachable kickstand if you'd rather put it on a TV stand. In any case, it's stylish in a way that most antennas simply don't strive to be. And if you want, you can mount it in an attic or even outside.
But that style comes with frustrations. We struggled mightily to attach a coaxial cable or 90-degree coaxial adapter to the back of the antenna, because its coaxial connector is wedged so tight to the backing. Ultimately, we used a screwdriver to remove the spongey support ring on the back to give our hands a bit more room, and then had to use pliers to tighten the adapter because it wouldn't budge using our fingers. It was a real pain.
Once it was finally up and running, we searched multiple times and found fewer channels with the ground-floor TV – just 4max, compared to 50+ with the others. None of the omissions were crucial, but it was still a difference. Upstairs, we had to play around with the location before hitting the same 50+ mark as the other antennas. The Blade is sleek and stylish, but the smaller size brings a couple of frustrations along with it.

Have you been thinking about cutting the cord, swapping your pricey cable service for an indoor HDTV antenna and free over-the-air television? Then you'll want to make sure you can get decent reception. And just like in real estate, indoor TV antenna reception is all about location, location, location. That goes for both where you live and where you place your antenna.

In some ways, using an antenna is easier than it used to be. Ever since the move to all-digital HDTV signals, TV signals tend not to attenuate, or drop off, the way analog signals did. That means the days of attaching tin foil to an antenna's rabbit ears to improve reception on marginal stations are gone.
Free Over-the-Air TV Is Going to Get Better
Once you have your antenna set up correctly, the quality of the stations you receive may be better than it was with old analog TV broadcasts—and perhaps even better than cable. If you live near a major TV market, there’s a good chance you can receive many local networks, such as ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC, PBS, and Telemundo.
Outdoor antennas, especially those on a roof or mast, generally offer the best performance, particularly if you're many miles from the nearest broadcast towers. But an indoor HDTV antenna is easier to set up, and for some people it's the only option.
Getting great reception from an indoor antenna can be a mix of science and art, though. Here's what you need to do.
Play the Field
Reception depended mainly on distance from broadcast towers, the terrain, and details of the surroundings, such as houses, buildings, trees, and so on. https://prolabtrade.com/best-tv-antenna-area. Some models worked better than others, but it was hard to predict which antenna would perform best in any particular location.

A number of models are directional, so they need to be oriented toward broadcast towers. Multidirectional antennas, which receive signals from all directions, might be better for urban locations, but they might not pull in the more distant stations a properly positioned directional antenna could.
One surprise was that we found little correlation between price and performance; often the cheaper antennas did as well as, or better than, the more expensive models.
So here's our advice: Try a few different antennas to see which one works best. To do that, you need to buy from a retailer that offers a no-hassle return policy and reasonable warranty.
Go High
If possible, place your indoor TV antenna in an attic or second-story location, preferably by a window. Sometimes objects in the room or roofing materials will interfere with the signals, so it pays to try a few different attic locations. Of course, having the antenna in one room and the TV in another requires running a cable through your home, because the antenna needs to be connected to the antenna (RF) input on your set.

In reality, most people will place the antenna in the same room as the TV. So try a few higher locations in the room, such as along the wall near the ceiling. Some of the newer flat antennas, such as the Mohu Leaf, can be painted, allowing them to blend in with the décor.
Point It
Most antennas are directional (these are also called "unidirectional" antennas), which means they need to be oriented toward a broadcast tower.
Once you know where the towers are, you can point the antenna in that direction. If you live in the suburbs of a big city, all the major broadcast towers may lie in the same direction, but you may need to reorient the antenna for different stations. As noted above, a multidirectional antenna doesn't need to be aimed but may be less able to pick up signals from distant towers that a directional antenna could receive.
When you're trying out different antennas, be sure to scan through the channels on your TV to see which antenna location pulls in the most stations.
Strike Up the Bands
Back in the analog TV signal days, most of your major broadcast channels, say, through 13, were located in the lower-frequency VHF band.
But ever since the transition to all-digital broadcasts, and the subsequent spectrum auction that saw many stations shift locations, local channels are now on both UHF and VHF bands. So you want an antenna that does well with both bands, to make sure that you'll get all the stations you can..